Continuing Medical Education (CME) Ground Rounds

CME Grand Rounds offers FREE ACCME accredited CME/CEU activities for all provider types

 

Gain knowledge and understanding about diagnosis and management of Alzheimer disease and related dementias

Our scheduled LIVE CME/CEU activities are shown below.

View Accredited On-Demand Activities 

Dementia Care Path Series for Healthcare Practitioners Series I: Caregiver Support and Education

Live October 29, 2021 12:00-1:00pm (PST)
This course is designed to help practitioners understand the role of the family or community caregiver.  Caregiver stress and burnout impact not only the patient’s health and well-being, but also the health and well-being of the caregiver.  Learn common coping strategies to guide caregivers through the caregiving journey as well as provide them strategies for grief management.

Dementia Care Path for Healthcare Practitioners Series I: ADRD Research

Live November 19, 2021 12:00-1:00pm (PST)
This course is designed to keep practitioners abreast of advances in the field of ADRD research.  This course describes the current research initiatives taking place in field of neurodegenerative diseases, specifically Alzheimer disease.  We will cover the importance of clinical trials, available clinical trials and the benefits of participation in clinical trials as it relates to finding therapeutic treatment modalities for the advancement of science in ADRD.

Series II: Care Management – Evidence-based Management of Behaviors

Live December 17, 2021 12:00-1:00pm

This course is designed to review the care management strategies of patients living with dementia from an ancillary perspective.  This course will review behavioral management and communication strategies as well as environmental factors that may contribute to behavioral challenges.  Pharmacological approaches will also be discussed. 

 

Series II:  Care Management – Managing Basic ADL’s

Live January 28, 2022 12:00-1:00pm (PST)

This course is designed to help practitioners implement strategies to keep patients living as independently as possible by learning techniques to help manage neurodegenerative conditions.  We will review techniques involved with managing anorexia and dysphagia as well as address bathing, hygiene and resistance to assistance.   

Series II: Care Management – Exercise and Recreation Strategies for Patients Living with Dementia

Live February 25, 2022 12:00-1:00pm

This course is designed to help practitioners identify specific therapeutic modalities to ensure strength, balance, and reduce the risk falls in patients with neurocognitive disorders.  Practitioners will learn specific recreational and exercise strategies that keep patients with a neurodegenerative condition at optimal physical health, living as independent as possible.            

 

Series III: Advance Care Planning – Making Healthcare Decisions

Live March 25, 022 12:00-1:00pm (PST)

This course is designed to help practitioners understand ethical considerations of healthcare decisions in the context of “what matters” as part of the 4M’s framework of Age Friendly Health Systems.

Series III: Advance Care Planning – The Role of Medical Professionals

Live April 22, 2022 12:00-1:00pm

This course is designed to help practitioners understand their role in advance care planning.   We will review available resources for end of life wishes, discuss strategies to help patients and loved ones reflect on their priorities and guide patients and family members through communicating their wishes and putting their wishes in writing. This course will also discuss resources for patients and payor support of ACP.  

 

Series IV: Capacity and Competency – The Role of the Physician

Live May 27, 2022 12:00-1:00pm (PST)

This course will review the definitions and differences between capacity and competency, appropriate documentation of capacity and competency and certain considerations should a patient lack capacity.  This course will review capacity in Alzheimer disease and related dementias.                             

Series IV: Capacity and Competency – Dementia and Safety

Live June 24, 2022 12:00-1:00pm

This course will review the topic of dementia and driving, discuss considerations to retire driving activities, strategies to discuss driving with patients and caregivers, as well as review other safety issues such as medication management, being home alone, and cooking.  Community resources to help with these discussions will also be reviewed.  

 

Online Post-Test and CE/CME Credit Form

Evaluation and Claim Credit

To begin the video, scroll to “Course Content”. Click the name of the video to begin. Once you begin the video, you must watch it in its entirety to claim credit. Fast-forwarding has been disabled. You may pause the video briefly if needed. Do not close the browser window as doing so will require you to start over.

Instructions to Claim Your CME AMA PRA Category 1 Certificate: (Live ONLY – On-demand: please follow instructions below)

Copy and paste the link below into your browser

https://cmetracker.net/UNEV/Publisher?page=pubOpen#/getCertificate

 

Sign in to the CME portal to activate account or create an account

Enter the Activity Code for this event (will be provided on day of event)

Once you complete the online evaluation you will be able to print or download your certificate. 

If you are claiming credits as a SW, PT/OT/ST, of Psychologist, you may print your certificate directly from our website at the end of this activity once you’ve completed the evaluation:

Once you have reached the end of the video, you will be prompted to complete a Post-test and a Post-activity evaluation form.  Once these activities are completed, click the “Download Certificate” button to print a copy of your certificate. 

 

Failure to complete the process will result in the credit not being awarded to you.

For questions concerning the online evaluation or your certificate, please contact Kate Ingalsby at (702) 219-4938 or email at ingalsk@ccf.org

Continuing Education Credit

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint providership of the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine and the Division of Child and Family Services. The University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education to physicians.

Physicians: The University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nurses: The University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine approves this program for 1.0 hours of nursing continuing education credit.

Disclosures

As an accredited provider of continuing medical education through the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine must ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all its educational activities. In order to assure that information is presented in a scientific and objective manner, The University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine requires that anyone in a position to control or influence the content of a continuing medical education activity disclose relevant financial relationships with any commercial or proprietary entity producing health care goods or services relevant to the content being planned or presented. Following are those disclosures.

All presenters, planners or anyone in a position to control the content of this continuing medical education activity have disclosed all affiliations/financial interests (if any) and indicated whether they or their spouse/legally recognized domestic partner has any financial relationships with commercial interests related to the content of this activity.

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Medical Issues that Contribute to Cognitive Impairment

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Jack CR, Jr., Holtzman DM. Biomarker modeling of Alzheimer’s disease. Neuron. 2013;80 (6):1347-1358.

Jak AJ, Bangen KJ, Wierenga CE, Delano-Wood L, Corey-Bloom J, Bondi MW. Contributions of neuropsychology and neuroimaging to understanding clinical subtypes of mild cognitive impairment. Int Rev Neurobiol. 2009;84:81-103.

Petersen RC, Knopman DS. MCI is a clinically useful concept. Int Psychogeriatr. 2006;18 (3):394-402; discussion 409-314.

Cerhan JR, Folsom AR, Mortimer JA, et al. Correlates of cognitive function in middle-aged adults. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Investigators. Gerontology. 1998;44 (2):95-105.

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CY 2021 Physician Fee Schedule final rule (85 FR 84472) modified CPT code 99483 by adding it as a permanent telehealth service, increasing its valuation, and defining it as a primary care service in the Medicare Shared Savings Program https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2020-12-28/pdf/2020-26815. pdf#page=278 

Medicare Wellness Visits educational tool for more information about AWV’s https://www.cms.gov/ Outreach-and-Education/Medicare-Learning-Network-MLN/MLNProducts/preventive-services/medicarewellness-visits.html

 

Action Planning after a Dementia Diagnosis

 

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Brain Health I: The Sceince Behind Brain Health

 

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Brain Health II: Agents of Change

 

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Healthcare Professionals Courses

The Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health offers various types education and training for healthcare professionals interested in the field of neuro-psychiatry.

Medical student, resident and fellow training

The Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health offers various types education and training for interns, residents and fellows interested in the field of neuro-psychiatry.

Community Based Education

Whether you have a career in healthcare, are a caregiver, or serve the community in various capacities, it is likely you will encounter individuals living with dementia and their caregivers.  Our E-learning courses make it easy to learn more about the challenges and experiences individuals living with dementia and caregivers face each day.  

Patient and Caregiver Education

Education is key when diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disease.  Access free live and on-demand caregiver and community education and resources.